Update: Peace of Cake

March 2, 2018

Update: Peace is No Piece of Cake

It’s been over a year since Colombia’s President Juan Manuel Santos signed a peace agreement with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), an army that was formed in 1964 to overthrow the government. Although the president’s efforts were recognized by the world—he was given a Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts—the people of Colombia weren’t all that convinced that the terms of the peace agreement made sense. It’s been a long road to peace, but it seems like the end isn’t quite as near as the president had hoped. You see, in Colombia, the FARC, although the largest and wealthiest rebel group, isn’t the only army around; there are at least three others.

I have taken the decision to suspend the start of the fifth cycle of negotiations, which was scheduled for the coming days, until we see coherence between the ELN’s words and its actions. — President of Colombia Juan Manuel Santos

The National Liberation Army (ELN) is one of those armies. Recently, President Santos had to pause any negotiation talks with this group. Why? Because the group killed several policemen in a series of bomb attacks. President Santos said, “I have taken the decision to suspend the start of the fifth cycle of negotiations, which was scheduled for the coming days, until we see coherence between the ELN’s words and its actions.” What does this mean exactly? It means that he’s not going to negotiate with the ELN until he can trust that they’ll do what they say they’ll do. Only time and actions will tell if there will truly be peace in Colombia. We’ll keep you updated!


Peace of Cake

In late September, the President of Colombia, Juan Manuel Santos, signed a peace agreement to end a 52 year civil war with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), an army that was formed in 1964 to overthrow the government. But to make it official, the people of Colombia had to approve of it.

So, in early October, the people of Colombia were asked to answer this question: “Do you support the nal accord to end the con ict and build a stable and lasting peace?” In other words, do you or do you not support the peace agreement? Sounds simple enough right?

But see, simply agreeing to support the peace agreement really wasn’t that simple. Agreeing to support the agreement meant not only supporting peace and justice, but also things like promises to provide more resources to rural areas and give the FARC a voice in government. So, no, it turns out that just over half of the voters didn’t love everything about the peace agreement and peace in Colombia will just have to wait a bit longer.